RSS

Archive | Film RSS feed for this section

Weekly Movie News Rundown

October 19, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Robert Downey Jr. has signed on to appear in Captain America 3.

Dave Bautista (Guardians Of The Galaxy) has landed the role of a henchman (apparently named Hinx) in the next Bond film.

Tom Hardy is reportedly up for the role of the lead villain in X-Men: Apocalypse.

Colin Farrell and Keanu Reeves are now said to be in the running to star in Doctor Strange. Jared Leto, Justin Theroux, Oscar Isaac, Ewan McGregor, Benedict Cumberbatch and Ryan Gosling are also said to be under consideration for the titular role.

Jena Malone is said to be playing Robin in Batman VS Superman: Dawn Of Justice.

Robert Redford is reportedly in talks to star in Disney’s remake of Pete’s Dragon.

Guillermo Del Toro let it slip that he’s already planning for a third Pacific Rim.  The second entry is due in theaters on April 7, 2017.

Warner Bros. is said to be in talks with Will Smith, Tom Hardy, Ryan Gosling and Margot Robbie (The Wolf Of Wall Street) for the adaptation of Suicide Squad.

Scarlett Johansson has reportedly been offered the lead role in Dreamworks’ live action version of Ghost In The Shell.  Rupert Sanders (Snow White And The Huntsman) is set to direct.

Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them will be released on November 18, 2016, and the following two films in the Harry Potter spin-off trilogy will be out in 2018 and 2020.  David Yates is expected to direct.

Ryan Gosling may star in The Secret Life Of Houdini for Dean Parisot (Red 2).

Christian Bale is said to be the top choice to replace Leonardo DiCaprio in Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs biopic.

Pedro Pascal (Game Of Thrones) may portray Pontius Pilate in the Ben-Hur remake.  Also, Gal Gadot has reportedly landed the lead female role in the film.

Javier Bardem is in talks to be the villain in Pirates Of The Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales.

Warner Bros. and New Line Cinema have officially released their DC-centric schedule:

Batman VS Superman: Dawn Of Justice (2016)
Suicide Squad (2016)
Wonder Woman (2017)
Justice League: Part One (2017)
The Flash (2018)
Aquaman (2018)
Shazam (2019)
Justice League: Part Two (2019)
Cyborg (2020)
Green Lantern (2020)

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Art And Craft (Noah)

October 16, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

A documentary about a benevolent art forger who’s pursued by the most nefarious organization of all – the art world. Right up my well decorated little alley.

The Reality:

The story of Mark Landis is, quite frankly, a fascinating one. Landis is a mildly schizophrenic, very, very talented artist who’s chosen, instead of showering the world with his own gifts, to forge some of the most famous paintings, well ever, and then donate these paintings to museums across the country. He doesn’t do it for money, or fame, he simply does because as he says, he’s become “obsessed with philanthropy.” Directors Sam Cullman and Jennifer Grausman have crafted a film that falls somewhere between a fly on the wall portrayal of Landis and a patched together whodunnit. Landis is the key figure in the film, and his interviews and general life style are fascinating, but the directors spend a good deal of time focusing on Matthew Leininger, a former registrar at the Cincinnati, Ohio Art Museum who’s become so obsessed with putting a stop to Landis’ decidedly epic string of forgeries that he’s lost his job and, to some extent, his mind. Through Leininger, the directors are able to showcase what I found to be the most interesting part of the film, the art world’s reaction to being duped. Landis himself is just a talented man, with a some mental issues, who loves art and as the movie seems to point out, likes to involve himself in a little “mischief.” The art world on the other hand, duped by a seeming amateur, only wants him taken down because he keeps fooling them. Yes, Landis, over and over again, takes on a variety of disguises to con the proprietors of various art establishments, but it never seems like he does it out of anything but of some misplaced sense of wanting to be needed. Grausman and Cullman do best when the camera is following Landis. When they stray to Leininger and those obsessed with Landis in their own right, the film feels a bit forced, as if they’re trying to impress upon the viewer just how strange and unlikeable the world of art curation is. I could’ve done with more of Landis’ methods, his art, his history, but even without those, Art and Craft is a fascinating piece of film.

The Lesson:

If a slightly creepy bald man wants to give you the original Mona Lisa, put a black light on it.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Fury

October 16, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Set in Germany during WWII, Brad Pitt is a tank commander on a dangerous mission with a crew that consists of Shia LaBeouf, Logan Lerman, Michael Pena and Jon Bernthal.

The Reality:

After Fury concluded and I was heading out of the theater I overheard a guy tell his friend that he didn’t like the film because “it had nothing to offer but senseless violence.”  If you ask me, that’s a totally unfair assessment.  Aside from the violent and gruesome onscreen annihilation of hundreds of soldiers, there’s also a variety of WWII-movie cliches and a lazy Aldo Raine-light performance by Brad Pitt that should not be so easily dismissed from the flak that David Ayer’s Fury deserves.  From the outside his film appears to be a dramatic look at the dangers that Sherman tank crews faced throughout WWII, but it’s actually just another meathead war film.  Is it the worst of its kind?  Not at all.  I certainly didn’t hate it, but I will say it’s hard to watch Fury and not just constantly feel like those involved could have done a lot better.  If you see it, pay matinee prices and keep your expectations in check.

The Lesson:

Some things don’t really need to be glorified.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: St. Vincent

October 15, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Bill Murray is a cranky old man who forms a special bond with a child and then mushy stuff happens.

The Reality:

If you’ve ever watched any sort of feel-good movie in your life, then you’ve already seen St. Vincent.  The film is rife with Oscar-bait-level cliches and every plot point in it is so predictable that many of you could probably guess them all correctly with nothing to go off but the trailer.  But you know what?  I liked it.  Yes, the film does absolutely nothing new, but it’s got a great sense of humor and it’s anchored by two immensely wonderful performances from Bill Murray and Jaeden Lieberher (Oliver, the kid next door).  Their moments on-screen (together and apart) are such a damn joy to watch that I willingly accepted every single generic moment – and there are a lot – that stormed off the screen.  See St. Vincent because of them.  And also, of course, to make sure you still have some feelings left in you.  Those are occasionally important, you know?

The Lesson:

Great actors make okay films better.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Men, Women & Children

October 14, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Jason Reitman takes a look at a few of the ways the internet has altered people’s lives.

The Reality:

At some point the internet touched Jason Reitman inappropriately, and now he’s made Men, Women & Children in an effort to strike back.  Unfortunately though, his incredibly bleak film doesn’t do much but emphatically point out that people are inherently bad and the internet is everyone’s preferred tool of moral destruction.  Well no shit, right?  In any case, while it’s not remotely insightful or interesting, Men, Women & Children is actually not an outright awful film.  Adam Sandler, Dean Norris, Judy Greer, Kaitlyn Dever and most of the rest of the cast turn in nice performances, and I think some of movie’s quirkier elements (various points of narration by Emma Thompson, on-screen text messages) are well done.  It’s just too bad that there’s not enough of a meaningful message around the noteworthy parts for any of them to really matter.

One day when Men, Women & Children is on HBO and the remote has slid into the couch and you don’t feel like digging it out, maybe watch it.

The Lesson:

Where’s the guy who directed Juno and Up In The Air?

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

October 11, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Warner Bros. is set to make a Lego Movie-spinoff that will feature Batman.  Will Arnett is set to return to voice the character.

Léa Seydoux (Inglorious Basterds) has reportedly landed a role in the next Bond film.

Jennifer Jason Leigh has landed a lead role in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight.

Paul Feig is officially set to reboot Ghostbusters will an all-female cast.  Katie Dippold (The Heat) will write the script.

Gore Verbinski and Steve Carell are said to be working on a paranoid thriller.

Stephen King recently noted that Josh Boone’s adaptation of The Stand could span more than one movie.

Sony is reportedly trying to launch a cinematic universe that’s centered around Robin Hood.  Hood would be the first movie.  Cory Goodman (Priest) wrote the script, which is said to be Mission Impossible meets Fast & Furious.

James DeMonaco is set to return to write and direct the next Purge film.

Rumor has it that Brainiac will be the villain in the Justice League movie.

The rumored characters for the Suicide Squad movie are Blockbuster, Multiplex, Jaculi, Mindboggler, Harkness, Vixen, and Deadshot.

The Jim Henson Company is reportedly developing a Dark Crystal sequel and big screen adaptations for Which Witch, Frog And Toad and Fraggle Rock.

Luke Wilson may portray Roger Goodell in a movie about the NFL and concussions.  Peter Landesman (Parkland) is directing and Ridley Scott is producing.

Sony has bumped Inferno (the follow-up to The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons) from December 18, 2015 to October 14, 2016.

Jai Courtney recently said he expects Terminator Genisys to be PG-13.  He also noted that he thinks the next two films in the new trilogy will be shot back to back.

Director Wes Ball has let it be known that he does not intend to stretch The Death Cure (the third book in the Maze Runner series) into two films.

Both Marvel and Sony have confirmed that there have been some discussions about Spider-Man appearing in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  Obviously though, there are a lot of hurdles to clear and such a crossover isn’t expected to happen anytime soon.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: The Two Faces of January (Noah)

October 10, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Hossein Amini has written both great movies (Drive) and terrible movies (Snow White and The Huntsman). This, his debut feature, has a great cast (Viggo Mortenson, the very up-and-coming Oscar Isaac, and Kirsten Dunst) and the possibility of being pretty fantastic.

The Reality:

The Two Faces of January is like the Patricia Highsmith novel you’ve never read. Deeply steeped in the most traditional of moody, noir filmmaking, Amini and company crank out a seedy, desperate bit of filmmaking that creates tension through the fickle flaws of its cast of characters and the incredibly way Amini’s script works to turn the viewers expectations on their heads. What starts as, well at least how you might believe it starts as, a film about a young conman (Oscar Isaac) entrenching himself into the lives of a wealthy American couple traveling in Rome (Viggo Mortenson and Kirsten Dunst) quickly turns into a crime cover-up story as Mortenson’s character begins to show who he really is. That’s not it though, on the run from the law, the film swaps intentions again, and Mortenson’s jealousy-wracked entrepreneur becomes the villain of the piece, with Isaac’s young, damaged conman a pawn in his shifty eyed plan. And that, is really just the beginning. As good as Dunst and Isaac are in the film, and they’re great, this is Mortenson’s movie. His Chester Macfarland is a character broken apart by his own internal demons. Jealous, corrupt, and trying to find his way to the surface, Mortenson exposes every twinge of emotional suffering on his sweaty face. Where we’ve come to know the actor for his more stoic roles, here Mortenson shows off another shade of his acting abilities – the damaged leading man. He’s charming and uses his perceived normalcy as a way to hide what’s really going on, and his presence on screen electrifies this film. Amini’s inaugural feature is assured, a truly classic bit of filmmaking unswayed by the typical pomp and circumstance of Hollywood today.

The Lesson:

Look who’s back, Viggo’s back.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Dracula Untold (Noah)

October 10, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

All I really needed was another Dracula film strangled by bad computer graphics and over-acting. Oh great, here comes one.

The Reality:

Dracula Untold feels like it’s over in 15 minutes. Most of the time it’s a plus when a film pulls you in so deep with its characters and plot that the time vanishes around you, but this certainly isn’t the case with this hastily thrown together, toneless, unneeded “prequel” to the story of Dracula. Instead the tale of Vlad the Impaler (Luke Evans) and his transformation into Count Dracula breezes along because it’s vacuous mess of a film. Vladly Vladerson is the beloved, reigning prince of Transylvania who is forced to take on the powers of the vampire when the Turkish Empire demands that he send his son as a slave tribute. Hopped up on vampire blood, Vlad gains the power to kill hundreds of people, raise a vampire army, and, as he does time and time again, turn into a swarm of bats and wreak havoc on his Turkish oppressors. And that’s it. There’s romance (of the most blandly PG variety) and a little bit of military camaraderie (though I can’t remember a single name of any character in the film aside from Vlad) but for the most part this is just Luke Evans in crushed velvet acting blood-thirsty and smashing people with an enormous bat-fist. And that’s just the beginning of the problems. This is a prequel, the story that’s supposed to explain why Big Drac is Big Drac, but all it does is flout the standard conventions of a vampire story. We’re shown that Vlad gets powers, but there’s no explanation of why being a vampire gives you the ability to explode into bats or why it makes you sensitive to light and silver. Nope, you just drink some creepy old man’s blood out of a clam shell in a cave and suddenly you can do, well, just about whatever you want. Supposedly Dominic Cooper shows up as a the bad guy, but all I saw was a borderline racist portrayal of a Turkish sultan for a few moments that may or may not have been Mr. Cooper. Dracula Untold is supposed to be the kick-off for the whole new Universal Monster connected universe, but this film is a limp dick with a forced ending that promises some sort of sequel. Gary Shore, the director, isn’t bad, he steeps the film in atmosphere and makes a small effort to beautify the computer graphics, but it doesn’t matter, there’s little to no script and when the film plods to a unsatisfying ending, you’ve already forgotten what you’ve seen.

The Lesson:

Just leave fucking Dracula alone.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: The Judge (Noah)

October 10, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

David Dobkin accidentally made one funny movie once, Robert Downey Jr. hasn’t made a good film since Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and the rest of the actors in The Judge look like they needed a paycheck to get their Infinti Pool cleaned. Pretty worried.

The Reality:

After I saw this film, I turned to my friend (a notorious over-liker of movies) and asked what he thought. “The realistic parts were actually pretty good,” he said. I asked, “what parts were those?” to which he replied, “like when Robert Duvall’s aging judge character has some sort of cancer-related fit and shits himself.” And that’s just about all you can say about The Judge, the best part of the film is when one of the great actors of the last century diarrhea’s himself in a bathroom. It’s almost pointless to dissect this film as an individual piece of work because it so strictly adheres to the cliche of the super-talented-prodigal-son-returns-home-to-save-his-family-and-learn-some-life-lessons-along-the-way film. This time it’s RDJ as a snarky lawyer who returns home to mourn his mother only to be pulled into a possible murder case involving … … … HIS FATHER (Robert Duvall). Turns out though the Judge (as everyone refers to Duvall) and his son haven’t had the love jones for each other for a while, so though Robert Downey Lawyer has the natural urge to defend him, it’s crotchety mess of a time. Both Duvall and Downey Jr. do fine work here embodying gruff and shinily annoying while holding tight to the rigidly defined structure of well, every Hollywood film ever. The film jumps the tracks though when it shies away from cliches and tries to bushwhack a new path. When I say “jumps the tracks” I mean, this film gets very strange and very depressing, very quickly. Sure, it has the requisite amount of cloying sap, but just when you think The Judge is going to end with smiles and joy, it takes a sharp right turn into depression town. I’m so tired of writing about films like these, high-gloss re-dos of the same tired themes, buoyed by strong performances but nothing but powdered, sugary shit in the middle. But this is Hollywood in the 2010s and you just hope that every once in a while some kind of winner will transcend the heap.

The Lesson:

I don’t even know. Some sort of cliche about the banality of modern film.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Kill The Messenger

October 8, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Jeremy Renner is Gary Webb, the infamous reporter who uncovered that the CIA had imported and sold cocaine in the US to support the rebel army in Nicaragua.

The Reality:

Kill The Messenger is an odd film.  Jeremy Renner is really good in it, and the true story that it’s based on is certainly interesting.  What I didn’t necessarily get about the movie though is the way it’s essentially the Cliff’s Notes version of both the story that Gary Webb reported and what happened to him after he published it.  Why not dive more into detail on what Webb had uncovered about the CIA and their supposed drug-import/distribution ring?  Is it because there wasn’t enough to show?  Was it actually all too loosely connected?  Or if Webb’s story was just the bait to get me roped in on how the CIA retaliated (allegedly?) by smearing his name and reporting, why not showcase that more?  While watching the film I honestly felt like Dr. Grant and the gang in Jurassic Park when they’re on the fancy ride and want to know all about the dinosaurs but it just keeps moving along without providing any real information.

Kill The Messenger could have been an eye-opener, but instead it just skips along over the top of anything legitimately important.  It’s certainly not a bad film, but I wouldn’t rush out to see it unless you’re a big Jeremy Renner fan.

The Lesson:

I guess some stories really are too true to tell.

Continue reading...

The Best Of Fantastic Fest 2014

October 7, 2014

0 Comments

Now that I’ve had some time to digest the 32 films I saw at this year’s Fantastic Fest, I’m totally ready to breakdown which ones were the best.  As always, thanks to the Fantastic Fest crew, Fons PR and the Alamo Drafthouse for putting on one of my absolute favorite things in Austin.  Next year’s fest can’t get here soon enough!

Dead Snow 2: Red VS Dead

The most ridiculous movie I saw at FF this year was Dead Snow 2: Red VS Dead.  The “horror” angle of the first entry in the series is pretty much gone and in its place is an awesomely campy and over the top time that repeatedly had me cracking up.  The only other thing you need to know about this film is that you’re going to want a lot of beer and buddies around when you watch it.

In Order Of Disappearance

If you like your comedies black, then you’re going to love In Order Of Disappearance.  Hans Petter Moland’s direction is twisted, sharp and clever, and I think the film features one of Stellan Skarsgard’s best performances.  He plays a snow plough operator who is seeking revenge on those who may have been involved with the death of his son, and his portrayal of the character is brilliantly intense and comedic.

Cub

I had high expectations for Cub, and it did not disappoint. The slasher film follows a troop of scouts on a camping adventure that, of course, goes to shit when people start getting murdered via elaborate traps and whatnot.  Movies with kids don’t often go full on brutal, but Cub does and it’s all the better for it.

I Am Here

LA Confidential, Batman, 8 Mile, and now I Am Here.  These are the films that I believe Kim Basinger will be remembered for.  In I Am Here she plays a woman desperate to have a child, and as the film glides along you follow her as she makes increasingly bold and dangerous decisions.  Be ready to stick to the edge of your seat.

No trailer for I Am Here is currently available.

John Wick

John Wick is largely just Keanu Reeves shooting nearly 100 people in the head because they killed his puppy and stole his car.  If you don’t think that’s for you, then it’s time to get your life together.

Nymphomaniac Uncut

Lars Von Trier’s five and a half hour cut of Nymphomaniac is a long, detailed journey that I found deeply interesting, and I definitely think you should see it.  Just know that you have to fully commit to the whole thing.  Also, don’t invite me to your screening.  Once down the sex-side of LVT’s brain is enough for me.

The Treatment

Imagine the crime and grime of True Detective without any of the heady philosophizing, and you’ll know exactly what to expect from The Treatment.  I love a good crime thriller, and I think it’s one of the best I’ve seen in a long time.

Goodnight Mommy

Goodnight Mommy is about twin boys who do not believe that the woman who has returned from the hospital is their actual mother.  The film is one that slowly unwinds, but once it opens up and gets going it’s one hell of a disturbing ride.  I mean, I’ll tell you this, I’ll certainly never look at super glue the same way.

Shrew’s Nest

Shrew’s Nest is a little Spanish horror film that came out of nowhere and thoroughly impressed me.  It’s centered around a woman who lives with her agoraphobic sister.  Things start out innocent enough, but then a man in need of help enters their world and it results in an outpouring of fucked up secrets.

It Follows

I got out of It Follows at 2am and there wasn’t a single moment on the way to my car where I didn’t feel the need to glance over my shoulder – that’s how creepy the movie is.  Big ups to writer/director David Robert Mitchell for crafting something fresh and legitimately unnerving.

No trailer for It Follows is currently available.

Nightcrawler

I’ve always liked Jake Gyllenhaal, but his performance in Nightcrawler is next level and I’m very much looking at him in a different light now.  I was all at once charmed by and scared of his Lou Bloom, a man with no scruples who is bent on making it big as a freelance crime journalist.  Also, I’m all kinds of ready to see whatever writer/director Dan Gilroy follows up Nightcrawler with.  The guy is for sure a talent worth keeping an eye on.

Force Majeure

If you asked me to pick an overall favorite from this year’s Fantastic Fest, I would go with Force Majeure.  The Swedish film deals with a family who undergo a scare while skiing and the result of it is something that completely strains their relationships with one another.  Not much else of what I’ve seen in 2014 has been as smart or engaging as Force Majeure.  See it when you can.

Honorable Mentions: Over Your Dead Body, Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey Of Richard Stanley’s Island Of Dr. Moreau, Redeemer, The Absent One, and Horns.

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

October 4, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Dwayne Johnson is set to star in a Baywatch movie.  It will be directed by Sean Anders and John Morris (Horrible Bosses 2).

Leonardo DiCaprio has dropped out of the Danny Boyle-directed, Aaron Sorkin-scripted Steve Jobs biopic.

Joaquin Phoenix will not star in Doctor Strange.  He reportedly did not want to sign a multi-picture deal.  Ethan Hawke is now the rumored frontrunner for the role.

Daniel Radcliffe has signed on for a role in Now You See Me 2.

Catherine Zeta-Jones is set to star in The Godmother.  The film is said to revolve around the true story of Griselda Blanco, who was once a Colombian drug lord.

Threshold Entertainment and the Tetris Company recently came out and said they’re working on a film that’s based on the classic game.

Robert Downey Jr. has let it be known that he’ll return for Iron Man 4 if Mel Gibson is allowed to direct it.

Jeff Daniels is reportedly in talks for a role in Ridley Scott’s The Martian.

The Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon sequel will be released through Netflix.  Also, the streaming service has signed a four-picture deal with Adam Sandler.

Warner Bros. is reportedly set to reboot I Am Legend.  Will Smith is not expected to return.

Eric Bana has landed a role in The Finest Hours.  The film is said to be based on the true story of a daring rescue off the New England coast in 1952.

Ben Affleck may star in Gavin O’Connor’s The Accountant, which is said to be about an accountant who moonlights as an assassin.

Rhianna may make a cameo in the next Bond film.

Dave Callaham (Godzilla) has been hired to write Zombieland 2.  Ruben Fleischer is expected to return to direct the sequel.

Kevin Smith has reportedly landed financing for Clerks III.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Gone Girl (Noah)

October 3, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

It’s a new David Fincher film folks, what else is there to say? I’d watch this guy’s film if it was just two and a half hours of shadows creeping across a wall.

The Reality:

Gone Girl, much like the book it was adapted from, is a deeply fucked up film. The story of Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and his disappeared wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) feels like a Douglas Sirk film as seen through the clear eyes of a certified sociopath. The film, for the most part, begins with Nick discovering that his wife has disappeared, leaving a healthy amount of blood and a series of anniversary clues. The next two and half hours is his dark journey from bewildered husband to suspect to something far deeper and far darker. Affleck makes a fine showing as Nick, a man who’s breached the unhappiness of his own marriage and now must navigate the twists and turns of his wife’s disappearance, but the juiciest, most deliriously insane bits fall squarely on the shoulders of Rosamund Pike’s Amy. Fincher has always been a director who plays with the idea of women and the way they effect men (Marla in Fight Club, Lisbeth in Girl With A Dragon Tattoo) but Amy Dunne is his greatest example. The director exposes the most stereotypical of perceived female weakness and the way our society feeds on these stereotypes and then flips them around, and uses them as a chest of weapons for Amy to use against the world. Though I always enjoy every movie Fincher makes, it feels as in some of his last few attempts (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Girl With The Dragon Tattoo the most prime examples) he’s leaned heavily on his visual acumen and the talents of his actors to make smooth, seamless films that look good, watch better, but never directly challenge the viewer. Gone Girl, as adapted by the author of the book Gillian Flynn, is not that movie. Though it plays in the sandbox of domestic squabble, seedy crime, and seedier revenge flicks, this is a dense, captivating movie, that ends on the kind of moral question mark we haven’t seen from Fincher in a while. This is not my favorite Fincher film, far from it, but as I’ve said before, Fincher’s cold, calculating visual prowess and his ability to craft movies just on the periphery of your standard Hollywood potboiler makes it as enjoyable as anything I’ve seen this year. Yes, the film drags, and at times I wondered at the narrative pace and the way the director decided to unveil certain clues, but issues aside, I found myself invested in these characters and this story on an intellectual level. It’s dark and crazy and no one is left unscathed when the credits roll, but beneath the seedy layer of heat and emotion, Fincher has crafted a movie that asks what is happiness and what exactly are we willing to do to achieve it. It might not be Fight Club, but it’s a movie ripe for discussion, and that’s my favorite kind of Fincher.

The Lesson:

Does this mean we have to wait another year or two before Fincher drops another bombshell on us? Fuckity fuck fuck.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Gone Girl

October 2, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

The acclaimed David Fincher directs acclaimed stars Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike in the big screen adaptation of the acclaimed book Gone Girl.  Greatness is expected.

The Reality:

My first item to note about Gone Girl is that you should go into it knowing as little about the story as you can.  The film features a variety of perfectly placed twists and turns, and knowing even one of them will take away from it.  And you don’t want that.  You deserve everything that Gone Girl has to offer, and there is most definitely a lot there for the taking.  On one hand you have a murder mystery/crime thriller that is one of the most anxiety-filled wormholes I’ve been lead down in a long while, and then on the flip side of things there’s a look at long-term relationships and what they do to the people in them.  And both, of course, are impeccably executed by David Fincher.  I don’t recall a single moment in the movie where I wasn’t just thoroughly impressed with his direction.  He’s so damn brilliant!  But you knew that.  Anyhow, Gone Girl is the first great movie of the fall season, and you need to see it immediately.

The Lesson:

In Fincher I continue to trust.

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

September 27, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Director Dan Trachtenberg recently noted that his adaptation of Y: The Last Man is officially dead.

Alex Winter has confirmed that he and Keanu Reeves are set to return for Bill & Ted 3.  Dean Parisot (Galaxy Quest) is expected to direct.

Liam Neeson has joined the cast of Ted 2.

Michael Pena and Jessica Chastain are reportedly in talks for roles in Ridley Scott’s The Martian.  Matt Damon is already set to star.

Viggo Mortensen is rumored to be up for a part in Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful 8.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt will reportedly play the lead role in Oliver Stone’s upcoming film about Edward Snowden.  The script is said to be based on Time of the Octopus, a document that was written by Snowden’s lawyer Anatoly Kucherena.

Peter Dinklage is set to appear in The Thicket.  It’s said to be a western, and he will apparently portray a bounty hunter.

Due to a scheduling conflict with Star Trek 3, Roberto Orci is no longer attached in any form to the The Mighty Morphin Power Rangers big screen reboot.

Taken 3 is officially set to be called Tak3n.  Sorry.

Patrick Wilson and Matthew Fox have joined the cast of Bone Tomahawk.  Kurt Russell and Richard Jenkins are already set to star in the movie, which is said to be a western that follows four men as they try to save a group of captives from a band of cannibalistic troglodytes.

Bryan Cranston and Matt Damn may star in Zhang Yimou’s The Great Wall.  The film will reportedly center around a group of British soldiers who witness the construction of the Great Wall of China.

Rumor has it that Avengers 3 may be a two-volume film.

Jude Law, Colin Firth, Guy Pearce, Dominic West, Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney will star in Genius.  The film is said to detail the complex relationship between literary giant Thomas Wolfe and iconic editor Max Perkins.

Adian Gillen (Game of Thrones) has landed a role in the upcoming Maze Runner sequel.

Bryan Singer is officially set to direct X-Men: Apocalypse.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...