RSS

Archive | Film RSS feed for this section

Movie Breakdown: Horrible Bosses 2

November 24, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

The mildly funny Horrible Bosses gets a sequel!  Wait.  What?  Why?

The Reality:

Even with the terrible Dumb And Dumber 2 and the truly awful Sin City 2 up for consideration, I think the clear-cut winner of 2014′s “most unnecessary sequel” award is Horrible Bosses 2.  I mean, it’s not as though the first film is a classic or something, so who the hell requested a second entry, and how do I thank them?  Oh yes.  That’s right.  I actually want to thank them.  Because despite being loaded with nothing but crude, insensitive, classless and stupid jokes, it totally cracked my shit right up.  Everyone involved is clearly having a ton of fun, and there’s a loose, infectious energy constantly present throughout the movie that’s difficult to not get caught up in.  I can’t say it’s for everyone (especially if you prefer “smart” comedies), but if you’re down for a good ridiculous laugh or 20, then don’t hesitate to seek out Horrible Bosses 2.

The Lesson:

Second time’s the charm.

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

November 22, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Channing Tatum may direct Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock.  It’s said to be about a troubled high schooler who intends to kill his best friend and then himself.

Terro Rossio (Pirates Of The Caribbean) has been hired to update Steve McQueen’s Yucatan.  Robert Downey Jr. is currently attached to star in the film that follows salvagers looking for Mayan treasure in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Bryce Dallas Howard is reportedly close to signing on for the remake of Pete’s Dragon.

Penelope Cruz has joined the cast of Zoolander 2.

Rumor has it that Tom Cruise is wanted for the Highlander reboot.  If he were to sign on, he would play Juan Sanchez Villa-Lobos Ramirez.

Sony has dropped the Steve Jobs biopic.  Danny Boyle is still attached to direct.

Peter Berg is expected to direct Hunt For El Chapo.  It’s said to be about Joaquin Guzman Loera, who was once the head of the Sinaloa drug cartel.

Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club) will direct Amy Adams in a currently untitled Janis Joplin biopic.

Brendon Thwaites (The Giver) may sign on for a role in Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales.

Martin Campbell (Casino Royale) is reportedly the top choice to direct GI Joe 3.

Jason Reitman is set to direct a movie based on the article I Would Only Rob Banks For My Family.  It’s said to follow a Texas family who pulled off two bold heists before getting caught during their third attempt.

Paul Greengrass is set to direct a new adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984.

Mel Gibson may direct Hacksaw Ridge, which will reportedly detail the true story of Private First Class Desmond T. Doss, a soldier in WWII who refused to kill or carry a weapon.  Andrew Garfield is expected to star in the film.

Djimon Hounsou (Guardians Of The Galaxy) will reportedly replace Idris Elba as the “Merlin-esque figure” in Guy Ritchie’s Knights Of The Roundtable: King Arthur.

Keanu Reeves may star in The Panopticon.  It’s said to center around a man who receives a mysterious package that contains a pre-recorded message from himself that warns the world is about to end and only he can save it.  Tarsem Singh (The Cell) may direct.

Chris Pratt may star in Cowboy Ninja Viking.  The movie will reportedly follow a counter-intelligence agent with multiple personality disorders who is sent to stop members of his unit who have gone rogue.

For X-Men Apocalypse, Hailee Steinfeld, Chloe Grace Moretz, and Elle Fanning are the actresses being considered to play young a Jean Grey., and for Cyclops it’s Ben Hardy (East Enders), Charlie Rowe (Red Band Society), and Timothee Chalamet (Interstellar).

Josh Boone recently noted that he expects his adaptation of Stephen King’s The Stand to span four movies.

Martin Freeman, Tina Fey and Margot Robbie are set to star in the adaptation of journalist Kim Barker’s comic wartime memoir Taliban Shuffle.

Melissa McCarthy is set to play Tinker Bell for director Shawn Levy.  No other details about the film are currently known.

Zach Braff may direct a remake of Going In Style.  The original followed a group of elderly men who, out of boredom, decide to rob a bank.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

November 19, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

“If we burn, you burn with us.”  Katniss has had enough of President Snow’s shit and is ready to take him down do just enough to setup next year’s Mockingjay – Part 2, the sure-to-be-amazing conclusion to the Hunger Games series.  Womp womp womp?

The Reality:

Let me start by saying this, Mockingjay – Part 1 does what it’s supposed to do, which is get folks ready for Mockingjay – Part 2, and as a Hunger Games fan I enjoyed it.  The film is a bit clunky and doesn’t really get moving until the last half hour or so, but my adoration for the overall story kept me from feeling restless or bored.  Also, there’s Jennifer Lawrence.  Goddamn she’s good.  Lawrence seems to revel in the pressure of having such an enormous franchise rest solely on her shoulders, and her Katniss is electrifying and an absolute joy to watch.

With all of that being said, it’s not possible to deny the unsettling taste that Mockingjay – Part 1 left in my mouth.  Frankly speaking, the film is a total cash grab.  There’s nothing in its two hour runtime that couldn’t have been trimmed down to be the first act of a single final entry into the series, and I found its plodding, setup-oriented approach to be disappointing.  In fact, the movie is so much of a non-standalone effort that I doubt I’ll ever willingly watch it again just on its own – I’ll just wait for the inevitable ultimate edition that will undoubtedly carry some ridiculous name like Mockingjay: The Complete Rise Of Katniss Everdeen.  I realize this isn’t the first time a franchise has been inserted into the maximum money machine (hey there, Hobbit Trilogy), but it’s always a disappointing when it’s as blatantly done as Mockingjay – Part 1.

See the movie because you know you want to, but know going in that anything of real importance in the series is still a year away.

The Lesson:

Setup movies are kind of a bummer.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Foxcatcher (Noah)

November 19, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

I don’t know if you could line up a more interesting story, with a more capable director, and better trio of actors. Every preview for this thing has been absolutely spellbinding and my only worry is that my own personal hype machine is working so hard that any film won’t be able to live up to its crushing force.

The Reality:

Foxcatcher is the most interesting, creepy, and beautiful mainstream picture this year. I haven’t seen everything yet, but I’m calling it now – nothing in the mainstream realm of Hollywood films is even going to scratch the surface of this film.

Based on a true story, Foxcatcher tells the tale of mega-gazillionaire John du Pont (Steve Carrell in all his nose-prosthesis glory) who buys the talents of one broken former wrestling gold medalist (Channing Tatum) and his brother, and the strange and horrible consequences of his actions.  To say that this film is just a showcase for its amazingly talented cast, which it is, is to short change it. This is a film firing on all pistons. Tatum, Carrell and Mark Ruffalo (who plays the emotional heart of the film in Dave Schultz, the brother of Tatum’s Mark Schultz) act above and beyond what you’ve seen from any of them up to this point. If the world didn’t already know Tatum’s background as a stripper-turned-movie-star, hell, if this was his first film, you’d have thought that director Bennett Miller ripped a professional wrestler right out of his opening stance and cast him in the movie. Tatum is a brute in this film, a man entirely defined by his self-conscious need to be the very best. He is intense and angry and you see all of this in the way he carries himself. Steve Carrell steps out of his comfort box here to play John du Pont, an eerie parallel to Schultz, in that the immense amount of power he already has is undermined by his want of having what he could never have. Prosthesis aside, Carrell soars in this film, embodying du Pont with a mental confidence but a physical weakness that says everything you’d ever need to know. Ruffalo, a small but vastly important role, does what Ruffalo does best, he spins an everyman character into a genuine beating heart.  When this story plays out and the fate of Dave Schultz is finally revealed, you are a robot if you don’t feel wrenched apart. None of this would work if not for the minimalist score and the gorgeous, eerie photography by Greig Frasier. This film is borderline silent, leaving the weight of it perched on the shoulders of its actors and its visuals, and Frasier’s work stands out above the rest. Long, quiet shots; close-ups that highlight the odd, beauty of traditional wrestling; the color palette – everything comes together to create a world where only this type of story could work.

My only gripe about the film is that it grows listless in the middle, but even this seems to have a point. We watch these characters stumble into relationships and Miller makes, what I think is a fine decision, to let them slowly develop. It isn’t absolutely riveting, but it creates an atmosphere that the ending of the film draws from, and that’s enough for me, even if my mind wandered at points in the second and third act. This isn’t the best film of the year (though it is a contender) but it’s the film that most challenges what we’ve come to see as a Hollywood production.

The Lesson:

Money is evil! Burn your money!

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

November 15, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Daniel Bruhl (Rush) is set to play a villain in Captain America: Civil War.

Mark Boal (Zero Dark Thirty) has been hired to write the script for the adaptation of Uncharted.

Jai Courtney (A Good Day To Die Hard) is said to be up for the role of Deadshot in Suicide Squad.

Michelle MacLaren (Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones) is rumored to be the top choice to direct Wonder Woman.

Justin Lin may return to the Fast And Furious franchise to direct a two-part finale.

Rawson Marshall Thurber (We’re The Millers) is set to direct Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart in the buddy action comedy Central Intelligence.

Quentin Tarantino recently noted that he still intends to retire after his 10th film.

George Clooney, Julia Roberts and Jack O’Connell (Unbroken) may star in Jodie Foster’s Money Monster.  It’s said to center around a man who takes a stock picker hostage and threatens to kill him.

Jude Law is set for the main villain role in Guy Ritchie’s Knights Of The Roundtable: King Arthur.

Christoph Waltz may join the cast of the next Bond film.

Park Chan-Wook will direct Second Son, which is reportedly a sci-fi film set in a futuristic world where neural microchip implants can store one’s consciousness, leading to black market body-swapping.

Christopher Lambert has landed a role in the Coen Brothers’ Hail, Caesar.

Shailene Woodley has joined the cast of Oliver Stone’s currently untitled Edward Snowden film.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Dumb And Dumber To

November 13, 2014

1 Comment

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

It took a whopping 20 years, but there’s now a sequel to Dumb And Dumber.

The Reality:

The trailers for Dumb And Dumber To didn’t do much to make me think it was in any way going to be a quality film, but I still strolled into the theater hoping to be treated to a handful of funny and/or memorable moments.

This was a mistake.

While Dumb And Dumber To is not as woeful as A Million Ways To Die In The West, it does rank just behind it on the list of 2014′s most unfunny movies.  It carries the same frame as its 20-year old predecessor (two goofballs take on a task and wacky stuff happens), but it’s 100% less charming.  I got about 20 minutes in and just wanted the damn thing to end.  But it didn’t.  Nope, it went on for another 90 minutes, and I had to watch Jeff Daniels bumble about (in what’s easily his worst performance to date) and Jim Carrey overact even more so than usual in an attempt to try and save every terrible, lazy and poorly written gag in the film.  Don’t let nostalgia fool you, there’s no need at all to see Dumb And Dumber To.

The Lesson:

The Farrelly Brothers haven’t been good since There’s Something About Mary in 1998.  Why do I keep seeing their movies?

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Dumb And Dumber To (Noah)

November 13, 2014

0 Comments

The Impression:

It’s been 20 years since my favorite comedy of all time exploded into the world. I know every line in the film, every beat, and spend more time than I should while under the influence of drugs quoting these lines. I actively boycotted the prequel and when the idea of a second film started flitting across the web, I crossed my arms and said “fuck no.” But now, after a few trailers hit funnier than they should, my expectations might be low enough that I’m ready to enjoy this son of a bitch.

The Reality:

I’m going to get this little bit off the table: this is not Dumb and Dumber. It’s not as funny or well made nor does it feature performances from Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels one-one-hundredth of the caliber. Dumb and Dumber is a goddamn classic and this, I’m almost positive, never will be. And you know, after spending my evening at the theater, embracing the opportunity to spend another couple hours with Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne, I’m perfectly fine with a second effort that doesn’t quite live up. This isn’t Dumb and Dumber, but it certainly tries to be, and when it succeeds, it’s hilarious, and when it doesn’t, well, it’s everything you’ve probably come to expect from a sequel to Dumb and Dumber. Where the first film had a some semblance of an interesting plot that drove the story forward naturally, this film sacrifices meaningful development in lieu of a series of hit-and-miss comedic gags that, more often than not, draw the exact same water from the same exact well previously tapped by The Farrelly Brothers. I mean it’s a film about two stupid dudes trying to find someone important while being chased by nefarious characters. There’s a scene with Binaca; a scene with a string-orchestrated memory sequence; a scene with the Shaggin’ Wagon; a scene where a trick goes hilariously wrong and so on and so forth. If you can get past that the film is funny, especially Jim Carrey, who is able to once again wrangle that rubberface of his into some truly sublime bits of stupidity. Daniels though, well, he just hasn’t aged as well. He feels like a stage actor playing the part of Harry Dunne, and though it never drags the film too far down, it doesn’t do much good. When Harry or Lloyd aren’t on screen, which isn’t often, the film is rote and boring and you can probably just shut yourself down for a minute or two. One more time: this isn’t a great film, it’s just barely a good film, but at it’s core it has Christmas and Dunne, stupider than ever, and even better, The Farrelly Brothers seem to treat them with enough respect that it never becomes a worthless endeavor.

The Lesson:

Kathleen Turner, I applaud you for committing yourself to film once more. Please never do it again.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Rosewater (Noah)

November 13, 2014

0 Comments

The Impression:

In almost any case, if Jon Stewart is somehow involved, I am one hundred percent sold on whatever it is he might be involved in. Toss in a healthy dose of Gael Garcia Bernal (a woefully absent actor as of late) and I should be up to my ears in excitement. But for some reason … I’m not.

The Reality:

As my girlfriend has said, countless times, since we saw Rosewater, “this is the type of film that needs to be made.” And I’m going to wholeheartedly agree with that. Jon Stewart has made a very, approachable, touching, funny film that, in a very traditionally Jon Stewart way, deals with one pocket of the world’s ignorance and how it directly effects one man and his family. Rosewater tells the true story of Newsweek correspondent Maziar Bahari, arrested for filming the beginnings of a revolution in Iran in the wake of a corrupt election, and imprisoned for, well, a very long time. This is the story, for the most part, of Bahari’s time with his Special Interrogator, a man he would name Rosewater (though the movie never really tells us this) and the way Bahari’s intelligence trumps the curtain of stupid that has fallen over Iran. Bernal is his very pleasant self, imbuing the character of Bahari with a gentle sense of humor to bring his massive intelligence down to Earth. The real standout of the film though is Kim Bodina, the previously unknown to me actor who plays Rosewater. He’s at once likable, despicable, thoughtful, and completely consumed by his need to be a part of the Iranian State and to please those who rule above him. It’s a wonderful performance and one I can’t imagine won’t get a nod come Oscar-time. And now, I know, I’ve lauded the film with compliments, but to be honest, Rosewater is a pretty, well, fair movie. Stewart is most certainly a first time director and not one with a very firm grasp on either aesthetic style (the film bounces back and forth between a glossy perfume ad, the b-roll of No Reservations and PBS reenactment) or consistent tone. Yeah, sure, he’s able to tell the story and to stand back and let his actors act, but he doesn’t do so with much of a vision or goal. The scenes with Bernal and Bodina are stellar, but the rest of the film, thematically and narratively never seems to find its foothold or its path. It meanders aimlessly, in the most pleasant of ways, but when Stewart decides to call it a day, I can’t say I know what it was Bahari learned or what about him changed. He simply soldiered through a relatively terrible experience, highlighted the idiocy of some worse than average men, and then entered back into the world, to continue his quest to expose just that. Maybe I’m missing something or maybe Stewart didn’t hit his speaking points that well, but, for a movie that “needs to be made” it feels a lot fluffier than need be.

The Lesson:

I’m willing to give Jon Stewart another crack at this whole film directing thing.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Low Down

November 13, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Low Down details the troubled life of famous jazz musician Joe Albany (played by John Hawkes).

The Reality:

Low Down is a film that I want to be able to rave about, as it’s beautifully shot and features some great performances (Elle Fanning is especially deserving of praise), but it constantly fumbles over itself and ends up falling flat.  The movie appears to be focused on all things Joe Albany – his relationship with his daughter, his love of music, his drug issues and so on – but none of these items are ever fully explored.  You get a glimpse, then it’s off to another scene where Joe either is getting along with his daughter or disappointing her.  Where’s the depth?  Low Down might have been memorable if it had any.  Skip it and watch something else.

The Lesson:

Give me a reason to love you.

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

November 9, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

John Lasseter is set to direct Toy Story 4.  Rashida Jones and Will McCormack will pen the script.  Pixar will release the film on June 16, 2017.

Peter Berg will direct Mark Wahlberg in The Six Billion Dollar Man.

Star Wars: Episode VII has been given the official title of Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

The full cast for Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight has been announced – Samuel L. Jackson, Kurt Russell, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Walton Goggins (Justified), Demian Bichir (A Better Life), Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern and Channing Tatum.

Jamie Foxx is set to star in The Trap for Harmony Korine.  It’s said to be a gangster drama.

Christian Bale has dropped out of Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs biopic.  Rumor has it that Michael Fassbender may replace him.

Antoine Fuqua is set to direct Jake Gyllenhaal in The Man Who Made It Snow, which is based on the true story of Max Mermelstein, a Jewish hotel engineer who helped expand Pablo Escobar’s drug cartel.

Jared Leto is the rumored choice to portray the Joker in David Ayer’s Suicide Squad.

Noomi Rapace, Orlando Bloom, Michael Douglas, John Malkovich and Toni Collette are set to star in Unlocked.  The film is said to follow a CIA interrogator who accidentally provides useful information to terrorists and then must figure out a way to stop them.

Jason Statham is set to star in Mechanic: Resurrection.  Michelle Yeoh, Jessica Alba and Tommy Lee Jones have also signed on for the movie.

Kevin Spacey and Michael Shannon are set to star in Elvis & Nixon.  The film will detail a meeting between the two in 1970.

Scott Waugh (Need For Speed) may direct Inversion, which is said to follow two men as they try to save the Earth from gravity reversal.

Matt Damon recently confirmed that he is set for another Bourne movie.

If you’d like more info on the upcoming Warcraft film from Duncan Jones, then click here.

Uma Thurman will star in Night And Fog.  She will portray Vera Atkins, who was an intelligence officer in France during WWII.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

In Review: Austin Film Festival 2014

November 6, 2014

0 Comments

Austin Film Festival has come and gone!  This year I managed to catch eight films, and mini-reviews of each one await you below.  Read on.

The Humbling

The Humbling isn’t a bad movie, but it does play like a way less interesting version of Birdman (both deal with aging actors trying to sort out their lives and careers).  Only seek it out if you’re a diehard fan of Al Pacino.

The Suicide Theory

The Suicide Theory features an interesting concept – a suicidal guy hires someone to kill him but somehow he always survives the attempts on his life – and has some good moments in it, but the last act features a variety of shoehorned twists that just really damage the film overall.

Wild

I’ve never been a big fan of Reese Witherspoon, but I can’t deny that she’s pretty fantastic in Wild.  It’s her dedicated performance that keeps director Jean-Marc Vallee’s film from feeling like a wad of Oscar bait.

The Living

Going into The Living I had heard good things, but I just didn’t care much for it.  The film’s two distinct stories are shallow messes, and because of that I often found myself wondering when I might start to care about what was happening on the screen.  It was good to see Fran Kranz (Cabin In The Woods) in something new, though.

The Imitation Game

The Imitation Game is the best film I saw at this year’s Austin Film Festival.  Benedict Cumberbatch is spectacular in his portrayal of Alan Turing, and the story itself is not only interesting, but also thoroughly heartbreaking.  See it as soon as you can.

One Eyed Girl

For much of One Eyed Girl, I liked where it was going.  A guy is having some issues, he winds up in a cult-like group, and then they … help him.  What?  No way!  Well, no way is right.  The movie eventually takes the exact turn you think it will (but hope it doesn’t) and then it’s just another okay experience.

The Sound And The Fury

What are you doing, James Franco?  You never go full retard.

Rosewater

I liked Jon Stewart’s directorial debut, but I will say that it has some tonal issues.  There are a lot of parts that could have used a very serious/scary touch, but they’re done in an almost lighthearted way, and it’s a bit jarring.

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Interstellar

November 4, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

Christopher Nolan goes full-on sci-fi and launches Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway and others into space in an attempt to save the world.

The Reality:

Let’s face it, Christopher Nolan is eternally expected to WOW viewers.  If he were to churn out something small or lacking in ambition, then the world would immediately frown and pout until he did something that at least attempted to blow their minds.  For a movie like Interstellar, which details a group of humans who head into a wormhole with the hopes of finding a way to save the human race, you would think that a “swing for the fences” approach would work best, and for the most part it does.  The film is wildly ambitious and often stunning.  I saw a 70MM print at the IMAX, and I routinely found myself having to pick my jaw up off the floor.  Few do big like Nolan does, and Interstellar contains some of the most impressive sci-fi imagery to ever grace the silver screen.  Unfortunately though, I think the drive to stun also hampers the film.  There are quite a few laughable plot points that happen just so Nolan can move on to the next dazzling visual, and much of the “science” seems sort of glossed over so that movie is just under three hours instead of having to be a mini series.  Also, like a lot of Nolan films, the third act wobbles as it tries to tie everything up nice and neat.

Regardless of its story and the various details that seem to be missing from it, Interstellar is a can’t-miss event, and you have to see it at the theater to get the full effect that Nolan is going for.  Yeah, at some point you’ll start to feel the film’s hefty run time and there are moments where you’ll roll your eyes at its silliness, but you’ll still walk out of the theater knowing you saw something important.

The Lesson:

In Nolan I continue to trust.

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

November 1, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Gal Gadot has dropped out of the Ben-Hur remake due to scheduling issues related to her Wonder Woman commitments.

Seth Rogen will portray Steve Wozniak in Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs biopic.  Also, Jessica Chastain is said to be up for a role in the film.

Rumor has it that Sony is considering doing a team-up movie (currently titled Glass Ceiling) that would bring all of the female characters from the Spider-Man comics together.

Michael Bay is reportedly in talks to direct 13 Hours.  The movie is said to be about the attack on the American embassy in Libya that killed US Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens.

Cara Delevingne (Anna Karenina) is said to be up for the role of Harley Quinn in Suicide Squad. She’s also reportedly in talks for a part in Pirates Of The Caribbean 5.

The duo of Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo (Livid) will direct Leatherface, which is the prequel to Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Josh Zetumer (this year’s Robocop) has been hired to write the Gambit spin-off movie that will star Channing Tatum.

David Twohy (Riddick) has been hired to direct Replay.  The movie is said to be a time travel thriller.

Eric Bana will star in the Ricky Gervais-directed Special Correspondents.  It’s said to be about a struggling journalist who fakes front line war reports from the comfort of his home.

Fast & Furious 7 has been retitled Furious 7.

Keanu Reeves will star in Replicas.  The movie will reportedly center around a man bent on bringing back his dead family.

Charlie Hunnam (Pacific Rim) will star in A Prayer Before Dawn.  It’s said to be a mash-up of Drive and The Raid.

Marvel has announced plans for phase three of its cinematic universe.  This includes casting Chadwick Boseman as Black Panther and posting the following schedule:

May 6, 2016: Captain America: Civil War
November 4, 2016: Doctor Strange
May 5, 2017: Guardians Of The Galaxy 2
July 28, 2017: Thor: Ragnarok
November 3, 2017: Black Panther
May 4, 2018: Avengers: Infinity War – Part 1
July 5, 2018: Captain Marvel
November 2, 2018: Inhumans
May 3, 2019: Avengers: Infinity War – Part 2

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Weekly Movie News Rundown

October 25, 2014

0 Comments

Time for your weekly movie news update!  Below you’ll find a slew of sentences meant to provide a brief glimpse of what’s been going on over the past week in movieland.  If something leaves you desperate for more info, then my advice is to do a little extra research on one or all of the following fantastic sites:  Latino Review, Dark Horizons, Ain’t It Cool News, CHUD and/or JoBlo.  Read on!

Jesse Eisenberg is reportedly in talks to play Lex Luthor in David Ayer’s upcoming Suicide Squad movie.

Producer Ed Pressman recently noted that production for The Crow remake will begin next year.  Luke Evans is said to still be the frontrunner to star in the film.

Christian Bale is officially set to star in Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs biopic.

James Wan has signed on to direct The Conjuring 2.

Frank Grillo may star in the Skyline sequel, Beyond Skyline.

Ethan Hawke is set to star in Born To Be Blue, which is said to be about jazz singer/songwriter Chet Baker.

Paul Greengrass will direct The Tunnels.  The movie is said to be based on the true story of a covert mission where West Germans tried to get friends and family out of East Berlin.

The shortlist for Wonder Woman directors is reportedly as follows: Kathryn Bigelow (Zero Dark Thirty), Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight), Mimi Leder (Deep Impact), Karyn Kusama (Aeon Flux), Julie Taymor (Across The Universe), Michelle MacLaren (Game Of Thrones) and Tricia Brook (The Walking Dead).

Sebastian Stan (Captain America: The Winter Soldier), Chiwetel Ejiofor and Mackenzie Davis (Halt And Catch Fire) have joined the cast of Ridley Scott’s The Martian.

Charlie Kaufman has signed on to write an adaptation of Arthur Herzog’s IQ 83.  Steve Carell is expected to star in the film.

The film and TV rights for John Carter Of Mars have reverted back to Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc.  The company has noted that they are “seeking a new studio to continue this seminal Sci-Fi adventure.”

Patrick Stewart has signed on for a role Green Room.  Directed by Jeremy Saulnier (Blue Ruin), the film is said to follow a punk band trying to survive after witnessing a white supremacist gang commit a horrific act of violence.

Eddie Murphy is reportedly in talks to star in Cook.  It’s said to follow a chef that gets hired by a dying man who wants him to cook for his girlfriend and daughter after he dies.

This Week’s Notable Trailers

Continue reading...

Movie Breakdown: Birdman

October 23, 2014

0 Comments

People are doing traditional-style reviews all over the web, so we decided to try something different.  In each “breakdown” we’ll take a look at what a film’s marketing led us to believe, how the movie actually played, and then what we learned from it all.  Read on!

The Impression:

The Michael Keaton-lead Birdman is a black comedy directed by the revered Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.  Early viewers have yet to stop raving about it.

The Reality:

Most of the hype I’ve heard about Birdman has been in regards to its cast, and they are certainly deserving of an enormous amount of praise.  Michael Keaton, Edward Norton, Zach Galifianakis and Emma Stone turn in award-worthy performances, and I was often impressed with the work done by the rest of the film’s familiar faces.  However, I think the actual star of Birdman is its co-writer, director and producer, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, who has crafted something that is a complete mindfuck both technically and thematically.

Personally, I found Birdman to be the most brilliantly weird thing I’ve seen this year.  The film is immensely meta, intricately designed and loaded with raw intensity, and I found it to be an impressive effort.  With that being said, I can’t say it’s for everyone.  While the movie is an exhilarating ride, it’s also exhausting in the way it throws an avalanche of exposition at you over the course of one long continuous take.  So in other words, it never stops moving.  There are no moments to breathe or think about what’s happening on the screen, Inarritu just plows forward and you either commit and go all in or you put on your bewildered hat and wonder if you can get your money back.  Also, while the film has been advertised as some sort of anti-superhero black comedy, it’s actually less of that and more of a bizarre, deeply layered look at art, acting and so on, and I have no doubt that some of you will find it to be pretentious babel.

Seek it out only if you’re an adventurous, experimental-loving movie-goer.

The Lesson:

I think I understood it.  Did I understand it?  I probably didn’t understand it.

Continue reading...